Home > The Russian Worlds of Islam (syllabus)

The Russian Worlds of Islam (syllabus)

 

RiaM, “The life of people in the Soviet East and in capitalist countries” (1920s), Courtesy of Mardjani Foundation. 

RiaM, “The life of people in the Soviet East and in capitalist countries” (1920s), Courtesy of Mardjani Foundation.

 

Head Instructor: Dr. Timothy Nunan

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Today’s Russian Federation has a larger Muslim population than any country in Europe or the United States, and in spite of the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Russia still directly rules over Muslim-majority regions like Chechnya, Dagestan, and Tatarstan. However, the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union remain rather peripheral to historical discussions of Islam and empires, as well as to discussions of multiculturalism or secularism. This seminar explores the Russian worlds of Islam, beginning in the context of the Orthodox Romanov autocracy and ending shortly after the collapse of the officially atheist Marxist-Leninist Soviet Union. Focusing on developments inside Russia’s borders, we will compare Russia’s encounters with Islam to those of other polities. We will also work closely with newly available and translated editions of Russian and Soviet archival documents, honing our interpretative skills as historians. Students will thus emerge from the course with concrete skills that they can apply to the study of states’ and empires’ relations with Islam and religion more broadly. They will also be prepared to view Russia as a generative setting for theories about Islam in the modern world. 

FINDING THE READINGS

Readings are on reserve at the institute library of the Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut. Students looking to get up to speed or who desire more background are encouraged to consult the following books: 

  • Paul Bushkovitch, A Concise History of Russia (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011)
  • Timothy Colton, Russia: What Everyone Needs to Know (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016).
  • Valerie Ann Kivelson and Ronald Grigor Suny, Russia’s Empires (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016)
  • Marshall Poe, The Russian Moment in World History (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2006).
  • Robert Service, Russia and its Islamic World (Stanford, CA: Hoover Institution Press, 2017)
  • Vladislav Zubok, A Failed Empire: The Soviet Union in the Cold War (Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2007).

 Additionally, students are invited to listen to the podcasts conducted by Sean Guillory (University of Pittsburgh) with authors of recent books, available online at Sean’s Russia Blog (http://seansrussiablog.org).

  

Weekly Readings

Unit I: Introduction

Week 1: Introduction and Course Overview

Week 2: Global Russia

  • Selections from Marshall Poe, The Russian Moment in World History (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2006).
  • Robert Crews, “Russia Unbound: Historical Frameworks and the Challenge of Globalism,” Ab Imperio no. 1 (2010): 53-63.

 

Unit II: The Russian Empire

Week 3: Multiconfessional Empire

  • Robert Crews, “Empire and the Confessional State: Islam and Religious Politics in Nineteenth-Century Russia,” American Historical Review 108:1 (February 2003): 50-83.
  • Alexander Morrison, Review of Robert D. Crews, For Prophet and Tsar: Islam and Empire in Russia and Central Asia,Slavonic & East European Review 86:3 (2008): 553-557. 

Primary Source Documents

  • Treaty of Kucuk Kanarji, in A Source Book for Russian History from Early Times to 1917, ed. George Vernadsky (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1972), 406-407.
  • “Prince Baratinskiĭ on The Caucasus, 1859 and 1862,” in A Source Book for Russian History from Early Times to 1917, ed. George Vernadsky (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1972), 607-609.

 

Week 4: The Conquest of Central Asia and Caucasus

  • Exerpts from Alexander Morrison, Russian Rule in Samarkand, 1868-1910 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008).
  • Hero of Our Time, directed by Stanislav Rostotskiĭ (film, 1966) 

Primary Source Documents

  • Documents from Anastasia Ganich Materials, available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/exhibits/show/transcaucasia_muslim_religious
  • “Russian Colonization in Turkestan Krai,” Russkiĭ vestnik 1 (1890), in Tsarskaia kolonizatsiia v Kazakhstane: po materialam russkoĭ periodicheskoĭ pechati XIX veka (Almaty: Rauun, 1995), 7-20
  • M. Galkin, “A Short Note On Russia’s Historic Rights in the Cities of Kokand, Turkestan, and Tashkent,” Russkiĭ Vestnik vol 58 (1865), in Tsarskaia kolonizatsiia v Kazakhstane: po materialam russkoĭ periodicheskoĭ pechati XIX veka (Almaty: Rauun, 1995), 7-20
  • Alexander Burnes, “The Importance of Bukhara in Great Game Politics,” in Islamic Central Asia: A Collection of Historical Sources, ed. Scott C. Levi and Ron Sela (Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2009), 281-287
  • “Gorchakov’s Justification of the Russian Advance into Central Asia,” in in A Source Book for Russian History from Early Times to 1917, ed. George Vernadsky (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1972), 610.
  • Aleksei Levshin, “Observations on the Qazaqs,” in Islamic Central Asia: A Collection of Historical Sources, ed. Scott C. Levi and Ron Sela (Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2009), 292-295
  • Nikolai Ignatiev, “Russia’s Agenda in Central Asia,” in Islamic Central Asia: A Collection of Historical Sources, ed. Scott C. Levi and Ron Sela (Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2009), 295-300
  • “Sergei Witte on Russian Policy in the Caucasus and the Far East”, in A Source Book for Russian History from Early Times to 1917, ed. George Vernadsky (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1972), 693-696

 

Week 5: Imperial Hajj

  • Eileen Kane, "Odessa as a Hajj Hub, 1880s-1910s," in Russia in Motion: Essays on the Politics, Society, and Culture of Human Mobility, 1850-Present, ed. John Randolph and Eugene Avrutin (University of Illinois Press, 2012).

Primary Source Documents

  • TBA 

Week 6: Muslim Modernism

  • Mustafa Tuna, “Madrasa Reform as a Secularizing Process: A View from the Russian Empire," Comparative Studies in Society and History, 2011 53(3): 540-570.
  • Alexander Morrison, ”Muslims and Modernity in the Russian Empire: Review Essay on Mustafa Tuna’s Imperial Russias Muslims: Islam, Empire, and European Modernity, 1788- 1914,” Slavonic & East European Review 94:4 (2016): 715-724. 

Primary Source Documents 

  • Jamal al-Din al-Afghani, “Lecture on Teaching and Learning and Answer to Renan,” in Modernist Islam, 1840-1940, ed. Charles Kurzman (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002), 103-110.
  • Ismail Bey Gasprinskii, “First Steps Toward Civilizing the Russian Muslims,” in Modernist Islam, 1840-1940, ed. Charles Kurzman (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002), 223-226.
  • Munawwar Qari, “What Is Reform?” in Modernist Islam, 1840-1940, ed. Charles Kurzman (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002), 227-228.
  • Ahmed Agayev, “Islam and Democracy,” in Modernist Islam, 1840-1940, ed. Charles Kurzman (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002), 229-231.
  • Abdullah Bubi, “Is The Period of Ijtihad Over Or Not?” in Modernist Islam, 1840-1940, ed. Charles Kurzman (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002), 232-237
  • Rizaeddin bin Fakhreddin, “Ibn Tamiyya,” Modernist Islam, 1840-1940, ed. Charles Kurzman (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002), 238-243.
  • Abdurrauf Fitrat, “Debate Between a Teacher From Bukhara and a European,” in Modernist Islam, 1840-1940, ed. Charles Kurzman (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002), 244-253
  • Musa Jarullah Bigi, “Why Did the Muslim World Decline While the Civilized World Advance?” in Modernist Islam, 1840-1940, ed. Charles Kurzman (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002), 254-256.
  • Mahmud Khoja Behbudiy, “The Patricide,” in Modernist Islam, 1840-1940, ed. Charles Kurzman (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002), 257-263.
  • Abdulhamid Sulayman Cholpan, “Doctor Muhammad-Yar,” in Modernist Islam, 1840-1940, ed. Charles Kurzman (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002), 264-269.  

Week 7: Civil War

  • Selections from Willard Sunderland, The Baron’s Cloak: A History of the Russian Empire in War and Revolution (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2014)
  • Obiya, C., “The Basmachi Movement as a Mirror of Central Asian Society in the Revolutionary Period,” in Social Protests and Nation-Building in the Middle East and Central Asia, ed. K. Sakai (Chiba: Institute of Developing Economies, JETRO, 2003), 88-104. 

Primary Source Documents 

  • “The Truth About the Turkestan Events. Transcript of Closed Session of the State Duma” (December 23, 1916), available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/items/show/20665
  • “Durnovo’s Memorandum, February 1914,” in Imperial Russia – A Source Book 1700-1917 (Hinsdale, IL: Dryden Press, 1974), ed. Basil Dmytryshyn, 372-390

 

Unit III: The Soviet Union 

Week 8: Marxism and Islam

  • Vladimir Lenin, “Appeal to the Toiling Muslims of Russia and the East,” Izvestiia 232 (December 7, 1917), 1-2, available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/items/show/11587
  • Mirsaid Sultan-Galiev, “The Social Revolution and the East,” TBA.
  • Ahmed Rashid, “Islam & The Bolshevik Revolution” Dawn (November 13, 2017), available online at: https://www.dawn.com/news/1370196

Primary Source Documents

 

Week 9: The Soviet Assault on Islam

  • Selections from Gregory Massell, The Surrogate Proletariat: Moslem Women and Revolutionary Strategies in Central Asia (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1974).
  • Douglas Northrop, “Subaltern Dialogues: Subversion and Resistance in Soviet Uzbek Family Law,” Slavic Review 60:1 (Spring 2001), 115-39. 

Primary Source Documents

 

Week 10: Great Patriotic War 

• Charles Shaw, “Soldiers’ Letters to Inobatxon and O’g’ulxon: Gender and Nationality in the Birth of a Soviet Romantic Culture,” Kritika 17, no. 3 (Summer 2016): 517-552. 

Primary Source Documents 

  • Secret Report on “Pan-Islamist/Pan-Turkic Movement in Central Asia and Tajikistan” (July 18, 1944), available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/items/show/11615
  • Secret Report on “Pan-Islamist Movement on the Territory of the USSR” (1944), available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/items/show/11614
  • “Introductory Speech of the Chair of the Organizing Commission for the Convocation of a Congress of Muslim Clergy and Believers of Central Asia and Kazakhstan – Abdumadzhitkhanov Ishan Babakhan” (1943), available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/items/show/21064
  • “Announcement to the Cahir of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR M.I. Kalinin from a Group of Muslim Clergy of Central Asia with a Request to Allow an Organization of a Central Asian Spritiual Assembly of Muslims in the City of Tashkent and to Convene Representatives of the Muslim Clergy and Believers of the Uzbek, Tajik, Turkmen, Kazakh and Kyrgy SSRs” (1943), available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/items/show/21062
  • “Greetings of the Spritiual Congress of Representatives of the Muslim Clergy and the Believers of Uzbekistna, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Kyrgystan and Kazakhstan to I.V. Stalin With an Expression of the Readiness of the Muslim Clergy to Call Believers to Battle with Germany in their Sermons” (1943), available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/items/show/19566
  • “Announcement to the Chair of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR Mikhail Ivanovich Kalinin from a Group of Muslim Clergy of Central Asia with the Request for the Formation of a Central Asian Administration of Muslims in the City of Tashkent” (1943), available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/items/show/19564
  • “Introductory Speech of Ishan Babakhan ibn Abdumadzhitkhan Delivered at the Consultation of Plenipotentiaries of the Republics Toward the Preparation of a Congress of the Muslim Clergy of Central Asian and Kazakhstan, Convenned on August 30, 1943 in the City of Tashkent” (August 20, 1943), available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/items/show/21063
  • “Polyansky to Molotov Regarding the Request from the Muslim Religious Directorate for Central Asia and Kazakhstan to Allow the Pilgrimage of six religious Muslims to Mecca in 1944” (September 14, 1944), available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/items/show/19583
  • “Memorandum Report to the SDRK Chairman Polyansky Regarding Work by the Uzbek SSR CPC Plenipotentiary for Muslim Affairs Ibadov” (November 30, 1944), available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/items/show/19623

 

Week 11: A Soviet Muftiate?

  • Selections from Eren Tasar, Soviet and Muslim: The Institutionalization of Islam in Central Asia (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017)
  • “Islam in the USSR” (film, 1980s), available online at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SEQSE4AN3rA 

Primary Source Documents 

 

Week 12: Islamic Revolutions 

  • Introduction and Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, “Islamic Government,” in Princeton Readings in Islamist Thought: Texts and Contexts from alBanna to bin Laden, ed. Muhammad Qasim Zaman and Roxanne L. Euben (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2009), 155-182.
  • Nikolaĭ Leonov, Selection from Likholet’e (Troubled Years) on Afghanistan (Moscow: Mezhdunarodnye Otnosheniya, 1995) 

Primary Source Documents 

  •  “Chair of the Council for the Affairs of Religious Cults Polianskii to the Plenipotentiary of the CARC for the Uzbek SSR Iskanderov on the Organization of an Appearance on Radio by the Chair of the Spiritual Assembly for the Muslims of the Transcaucasus Imam Babakhan with a Protest Against the Military Actions of the Dutch in Indonesia, As Well as a Text of the Appearance” (August 19, 1947), available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/items/show/19843
  • “Materials from Court Cases Regarding the Indictment of Unregistered Ministers of the Islamic Cult (Tajikistan), presented to the Council for the Affairs of Religions” (March 17, 1975), available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/items/show/16872
  • “Materials regarding al-Bukhari Tashkent high Islamic Institute director S. Babakhanov's stay in Morocco” (April 25, 1980), available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/items/show/16877
  • “Materials from the Council for the Affairs of Religions regarding international connections made by Muslim organizations in the USSR, addressed to the MID of the USSR” (January 19, 1981), available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/items/show/16882
  • “Presentation on the One-Day Seminar / Consultation with Registered Servants of the Cult and Chairs of Executive Organs of Religious Associations of the Muslim Bent on the Theme ‘Participation of the Clergy in the Struggle for Peace’” (February 14, 1983), available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/items/show/18709
  • “Islam and Soviet Politics (based on an assessment by the Institute of Social Sciences under the CPSU CC)” (1988), available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/items/show/16890
  • “Records of Conversations between Soviet Diplomats and Muslim Leaders from Arab Countries, as well as Other Materials Presented to the Council for the Affairs of Religions” (August 1980), available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/items/show/16879

 

Week 13: The Soviet Collapse Through Muslim Eyes

  • Ayatollah Khomeini, Letter to Mikhail Gorbachev (January 7, 1989)
  • Doctor Azadeh, “Investigation into the Economic Failure Based on Marxism (The Example of Socialist Russia),” Falaq 28 (July 20, 1991), translation on Blackboard
  • Excerpts from Mustafa Hamid and Leah Farrall, The Arabs At War in Afghanistan (London: Hurst, 2015). 

Primary Source Documents 

  • “Enquiry of the Plenipotenary of the Council for Religious Affairs under the Council of Ministers of the USSR in Ashkabad Oblast of the Turkmen SSR, M. Charyyadov to the Council of Religious Affairs Under the Council of Ministers of the USSR on the Course of the Struggle with the Influence of Islam” (May 20, 1988), available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/items/show/18409
  • Memorandum from the chair of the Council for the Affairs of Religions under the CM of the USSR, K.M. Kharchev, addressed to the CPSU CC (May 6, 1988), available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/items/show/16887
  • “Informational report from the Council for the Affairs of Religions under the RSFSR CM regarding the 5th conference of Muslims from the European parts of Russia and Siberia” (June 1990), available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/items/show/16897
  • “Letter from the Chair of the Council of Religious Affairs under the Council of Ministers of the USSR K.M. Kharchev to the CC CPSU about the Religious Situation in the Uzbek SSR” (February 20, 1989), available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/items/show/18713
  • “Letter to the General Secretary of the CC CPSU M.S. Gorbachev from a Group of Muslims in the City of Tashkent With a Complaint About the Actions of Mufti Sh. Babakhanov” (December 20, 1988), available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/items/show/18400
  • “Letter to the General Secretary of the CC CPSU M.S. Gorbachev from a Group of Muslims in the City of Tashkent with a Complaint About the Actions of the Local Authorities” (November 30, 1988), available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/items/show/18398
  • “Letter to the General Secretary of the CC CPSU M.S. Gorbachev from a Group of Muslims in the City of Jizzakh with a Complaint About the Actions of the Local Authorities” (June 9, 1988), available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/items/show/18395
  • “Memorandum from the Council for the Affairs of Religions under the USSR CM regarding the religious atmosphere in Central Asia, presented to the CPSU CC” (February 20, 1989), available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/items/show/16892
  • “Report from the leadership of the Council for the Affairs of Religions under the CM of the USSR, given at a meeting of CRA Staff” (1987), available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/items/show/16886

 

Unit IV: The Russian Federation

Week 14: Russian Islam in Film

  • Musul’manin (A Muslim), film, 1995, directed by Vladimir Khotinenko.
  • “Musul’manin: pressa fil’ma,” Chital’nyĭ zal: Kritiko-bibliograficheskiĭ zhurnal o kino 2 (1995-1996), 114-128.

 

Week 15: Russification of Chechnya or “Chechenization of Russia”?

  • Selections from Anatol Lieven, Chechnya: Tombstone of Russian Power (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1999), available online via Primo.
  • Uwe Halbach, “Chechnya’s Status within the Russian Federation: Ramzan Kadyrov’s Private State and Vladimir Putin’s Federal ‘Power Vertical,’” (May 2018), available online at: https://www.swp-berlin.org/fileadmin/contents/products/research_papers/2018RP02_hlb.pdf
  • Marlène Laruelle, “Kadyrovism: Hardline Islam as a Tool of the Kremlin?” Notes de l’Ifri 99, available online at: https://www.swp-berlin.org/fileadmin/contents/products/research_papers/2018RP02_hlb.pdf 

Primary Source Documents 

  •  “Materials Regarding the State of Northern Caucasus Islam (Based on Documents from the Council for the Affairs of Religions Under the RFSFR Council of Ministers. May-June 1989” (June 15, 1989), available online at: http://islamperspectives.org/rpi/items/show/16894
  • Jos de Putter, The Making of a New Empire (film, 1999)
  • Aleksandr Nevzorov, Purgatory (Chistilishche) (film, 1997)

 

Week 16: Migration vs. “Russia for Russians”?

  • Adrienne Edgar, “Marriage, Modernity and the ‘Friendship of Nations:’ Interethnic Intimacy in Postwar Soviet Central Asia in Comparative Perspective,” Central Asian Survey 26:4 (December 2007), 581-600. 

Primary Source Documents 

 


Possible Primary Source Documents for Final Paper

 

Chingiz Aitmatov, Jamila

Mikhail Lermonotov, A Hero Of Our Time

Fazil Iskander, Sandro of Chegem

Hamid Ismailov, The Railroad

Andrei Platonov, Soul

Aleksandr Pushkin, The Fountain of Bakhchisarai

Alexander Qazbegi, The Prose of the Mountains

Mukhamet Shaykmetov, The Silent Step

Leo Tolstoy, The Cossacks

Leo Tolstoy, Hadji Murad

Yuri Tynyanov, The Death of the Vazir-Mukhtar 

 

Works for Review in Final Paper 

• Alexandre Bennigsen and S. Enders Wimbush, Muslim National Communism in the Soviet Union: A Revolutionary Strategy for the Colonial World (Chicago: Chicago University Press, 1970)

• Gregory Massell, The Surrogate Proletariat: Moslem Women and Revolutionary Strategies in Soviet Central Asia, 1919-1929 (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1974) Nunan Syllabus - “The Russian Worlds of Islam” (26.08.18) 19

• Elizabeth E. Bacon, Central Asians Under Russian Rule: A Study in Culture Change (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1980)

• Alexandre Bennigsen, Mystics and Commissars: Muslims of the Soviet Empire. A Guide (Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 1985)

• Adeeb Khalid, The Politics of Muslim Cultural Reform: Jadidism in Central Asia (Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1997)

• Dale Pesman, Russia and Soul: An Investigation (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2000)

• Terry Martin, The Affirmative Action Empire: Nations and Nationalism in the Soviet Union, 1923-1939 (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2001)

• Allen J. Frank, Muslim Religious Institutions in Imperial Russia: The

• Islamic World of Novouzensk District and the Kazakh Inner Horde, 1780–1910 (Leiden: Brill, 2001)

• Virginia Martin, Law and Custom in the Steppe: The Kazakhs of the Middle Horde and Russian Colonialism in the Nineteenth Century (London: Routledge, 2001)

• Benjamin Nathans, Beyond the Pale: The Jewish Encounter with Late Imperial Russia (Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2002)

• Douglas Northrop, Veiled Empire: Gender and Power in Stalinist Central Asia (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2003).

• Adeeb Khalid, “A Secular Islam: Nation, State, and Religion in Uzbekistan,” International Journal of Middle East Studies 35 (2003): 573-598.

• Willard Sunderland, Taming the Wild Field: Colonization and Empire on the Russian Steppe (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2004)

• Nicolas Breyfogle, Heretics and Coloniziers: Forging Russia's Empire in the South Caucasus (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2005)

• Robert Crews, For Prophet and Tsar: Islam and Empire in Russia and Central Asia (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2006)

• Adeeb Khalid, Islam After Communism: Religion and Politics in Central Asia (Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2006)

• Mathijs Pelkmans, Defending the Border: Identity, Religion and Modernity in the Republic of Georgia (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2006)

• Jeff Sahadeo, Russian Colonial Society in Tashkent, 1865–1923 (Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2007)

• Alexander Morrison, Russian Rule in Samarkand, 1868-1910 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008)

• Michael Khordarkovsky, Where Two Worlds Met: The Russian State and the Kalmyk Nomads, 1600–1771 (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2006)

• Bruce Grant, The Captive and Gift: Cultural Histories of Sovereignty in Russia and the Caucasus (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2009)

• Paul Stronski, Tashkent: Forging a Soviet City, 1930–1966 (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2010) Nunan Syllabus - “The Russian Worlds of Islam” (26.08.18) 20

• Paolo Sartori. “Towards a History of the Muslims’ Soviet Union: A View from Central Asia”, Die Welt des Islams 50 (2010): 315-334.

• Edith Clowes, Russia on the Edge: Imagined Geographies and PostSoviet Identities (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2011)

• Eric McGlinchey, Chaos, Violence, Dynasty: Politics and Islam in Central Asia (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2011)

• Nile Green, Bombay Islam: The Religious Economy of the West Indian Ocean, 1840–1915 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011)

• Ali Igmen, Speaking Soviet With an Accent: Culture and Power in Kyrgyzstan (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2012)

• Eileen Kane, "Odessa as a Hajj Hub, 1880s-1910s," in Russia in Motion: Essays on the Politics, Society, and Culture of Human Mobility, 1850- Present, ed. John Randolph and Eugene Avrutin (University of Illinois Press, 2012)

• Morgan Liu, Under Soloman’s Throne: Uzbek Visions of Renewal in Osh (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2012)

• Samuel J. Hirst, “Anti-Westernism on the European Periphery: The Meaning of Soviet-Turkish Convergence in the 1930s,” Slavic Review 72:1 (Spring 2013): 32-53.

• Samuel Hirst, “Transnational Anti-Imperialism and the National Forces: Soviet Diplomacy and Turkey, 1920-1923,” Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East (August 2013): 214-226.

• David Motadel, Islam and Nazi Germany's War (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2014)

• Rebecca Manely, To the Tashkent Station: Evacuation and Survival in the Soviet Union at War (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2014)

• Willard Sunderland, The Baron’s Cloak: A History of the Russian Empire in War and Revolution (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2014)

• Agnès Nilüfer-Kefely, Becoming Muslim in Imperial Russia: Conversion, Apostasy, and Literacy (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2014)

• James Meyer, Turks Across Empires: Marketing Muslim Identity in the Russian-Ottoman Borderlands, 1856–1914 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014)

• Adeeb Khalid, Making Uzbekistan: Nation, Empire, and Revolution in the Early USSR (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2015)

• John Slight, The British Empire and the Hajj: 1865-1956 (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2015)

• Danielle Ross, “Caught in the Middle: Reform and Youth Rebellion in Russia’s Madrasas, 1900–10” Kritika, 16:1 (2015): 57–89.

• Eileen Kane, Russian Hajj: Empire and the Pilgrimage to Mecca (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2015)

• Karine Walther, Sacred Interests: The United States and the Islamic World, 1821-1921 (Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2015)

• Elena Campbell, The Muslim Question and Russian Imperial Governance (Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2015) Nunan Syllabus - “The Russian Worlds of Islam” (26.08.18) 21

• Charles Steinwedel, Threads of Empire: Loyalty and Tsarist Authority in Bashkiria, 1552–1917 (Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2016).

• Eren Tasar, Soviet and Muslim: The Institutionalization of Islam in Central Asia (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017)

• Botakoz Kassymbekova, Despite Cultures: Early Soviet Rule in Tajikistan (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2016)

• Douglas Little, Us Versus Them: The United States, Radical Islam, and the Green Threat (Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2016).

• Devin DeWeese, “It was a Dark and Stagnant Night (‘til the Jadids Brought the Light): Clichés, Biases, and False Dichotomies in the Intellectual History of Central Asia,” Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient 59:1-2 (2016), 37-92.

• Julie McBride, From Belonging to Belief: Modern Secularisms and the Construction of Religion in Kyrgyzstan (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2017)

• Pauline Jones, Islam, Society, and Politics in Central Asia (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2017)

• Nick Megoran, Nationalism in Central Asia: A Biography of the Uzbekistan-Kyrgyzstan Boundary (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2017)

• David Montgomery, Practicing Islam: Knowledge, Experience, and Social Navigation in Kyrgyzstan (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2017)

• Till Mostowlansky, Azan on the Moon: Entangling Modernity Along Tajikistan's Pamir Highway (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2017)

• Ian W. Campbell, Knowledge and the Ends of Empire: Kazak Intermediaries and Russian Rule on the Steppe, 1731-1917 (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2017)

• Regine A. Spector, Order at the Bazaar: Power and Trade in Central Asia (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2017)

• Ian Campbell, Knowledge and the Ends of Empire: Kazak Intermediaries and Russian Rule on the Steppe, 1731–1917 (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2017)

• Robert Kindler, Stalin's Nomads: Power and Famine in Kazakhstan (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2017)

• Victoria Clement, Learning to Become Turkmen: Literacy, Language, and Power, 1914-2014 (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2018)

• Victoria Smolkin-Rothrock, A Sacred Space Is Never Empty: A History of Soviet Atheism (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2018)

• Sarah Cameron, The Hungry Steppe: Famine, Violence, and the Making of Soviet Kazakhstan (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2018)